Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada
Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada

 

The Prescott Journal - January 22, 2003

By Astrid Strader, Project Supervisor, Horticulturist, and Garden Designer

Prescott Blossoms (PB) is busy planning for phase three. To review, phase one was the construction of the millenium pathway and phase two was PB 2002, the construction of the gravel pathways and starting the Prescott Heritage River Trail Arboretum.  So for phase three, there will be more planting at the arboretum, the completion of a native grass bed, the design and planting of a more formalized "parkette bed" at the far west end.  Community beautification projects will also continue to be part of our scope.  To aid in planning these community projects, a form is being developed to make it easier for PB to assist with projects (our main goal will still be training and development of youth for employment).

On Friday, Jan. 24, from 1 - 3 PM, PB will host a celebration of achievements 2002 at O'Reilly's Your Independent Grocer Community Room. Anyone is welcome to attend.

There's a growing movement "wild about gardening" and especially now is when I yearn the most to get back outside in the garden. Maybe you're like that too. Thank goodness for seed catalogues, in particular, those that specialize in native plants.  Choosing native plants, trees and shrubs means their chances of not only surviving our conditions, but also thriving in them (without pesticides/herbicides) are great.  Thriving also means attracting valuable wildlife, like the pollinators: hummingbirds, bees and butterflies - just as much a part of gardening as choosing the right plants.  There is a great web site to help you do just that.  It's part of the Canadian Wildlife Federation - just open www.wildabboutgardening.org. Then click on "gardening gab", then "native plant suppliers list".  Here you'll find local nurseries, catalogues and web sites where you can discover more about our beautiful natives.

Speaking of which, Tanya Telgen, one of our PB team members, researched one of the many shrubs we planted down at the waterfront.  Tanya writes that the grey dogwood, (Cornus racemosa), averages  3 m (9’) tall and because it suckers very quickly from its roots, it makes it difficult to tell it's width. The leaves are greyish-green and smooth to touch, turning a purplish- red in autumn.  Winter shows off their gorgeous red branches. The white flowers are in 4 cm (2’’) clusters, blooming in late spring. It is said that from one bush, 100 birds can enjoy the tiny red fruits. This dogwood prefers sun or shade, moist well-drained soils of any quality - a keeper for the naturalized landscape.

 

Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada