Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada
Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada

 

The Prescott Journal - October 23, 2002

By Astrid Strader, Project Supervisor, Horticulturist, and Garden Designer

Nine evergreens have now graced our arboretum, completing the tree planting for this year. However, the planting doesn't end there - many more shrubs will be planted in the spring along with a few more trees that were just not available this time of year.

Mulch, trunk guards and grass seeding will still take place. The stakes may look unsightly but they will be removed by midsummer 2003. That will truly be cause for celebration - perhaps Canada Day again?

Of the many shrubs to come the prickly wild rose (Rosa acicularis), is a bushy shrub, up to 1.5 m (60 inches) tall with bristly thorns. Even so every part of this native rose is edible and an important food source for birds and animals. In my own garden, I see chipmunks holding down branch tips while munching happily away at the flower buds. (They do manage to leave some to flower.) When the fragrant, single, pink flower is spent it goes to see, creating a scarlet, pear-shaped, fleshy 'hip,' about 1.5 cm (1/2 inch) long. Just three rose hips contain as much vitamin C as one orange and makes very tasty tea.


The Prescott Heritage River Trail with native
trees planted by the Prescott Blossoms

Prescott Blossoms plant tress at east end
of the Prescott Heritage River Trail

These shrubs grow in most types of soil, which is good because there is every type in the arboretum, including lots of coal and rock, which we remove and replace with topsoil and compost. The prickly rose has no disease or insect problems, unlike the typical garden centre rose varieties, and so, it's an environmentally friendly choice. In the wild, as in the arboretum, these shrubs will create thickets that are sanctuaries for such wildfolk as rabbits, game birds and songsters.

You see, the trees are just one part of the entire ecosystem that is being returned to nature.

 

Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada