Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada
Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada

 

The Prescott Journal - December 4, 2002

By Astrid Strader, Project Supervisor, Horticulturist, and Garden Designer

Last week I talked about how donors of trees to the arboretum will be acknowledged on a main gateway sign to the trail. In phase 3 of the project, which will begin in spring 2003, benches and historical placards will be added to the waterfront.  These have also been designed by Parks Canada and will be uniquely "one-of-a-kind". The character of the benches will replicate the look of the fort and will be custom-made out of cedar.  I'm told that working drawings are forthcoming and bids to construct the benches will be accepted to determine best price. Persons or business's wishing to donate a bench as a memorial will get the same recognition as other donors to the waterfront project - their name on a leaf-like marker placed on the symbolic donor tree as part of the gateway signage.  We invite you to drop in or call Melanie at the Municipal office for more info - 925-2812.

On behalf of the Town of Prescott and Parks Canada, Prescott Blossoms wishes to recognize, in appreciation, more donors of trees to date: Candy Alexander, Canadian Tire, South Grenville Girl Guide District, Bev and Foch Healy, Lion's Club of Prescott, Frank Muschalla (our first out-of-towner - from Toronto), O'Reilly's Your Independent Grocer, Strader-Ferris International.  Once again, these are not all the donors but I will get the chance to name them all over the coming weeks.

The waterfront site has parts of which are very sandy and dry - perfect conditions for the tough Pitch pine (Pinus rigida).  It will grow to an average 20 m (60') and is recognizable by it's twisting, yellowish-green needles in groupings of three, about 10 cm (4") long.  The high resin content in this species produced the name "pitch pine".  Early settlers would often ignite pine knots for torches.  The high resin content also made the wood decay-resistant and so, was popular for ship building.

Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada