Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada
Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada

 

 

 

The Prescott Journal - December 10, 2003

By Astrid Strader, Project Supervisor, Horticulturist, and Garden Designer

Christmas is around the corner and for the person who has everything - how about honouring them with a tree in the Prescott Heritage River Trail Arboretum? It's also a great way to recognize a special volunteer or group - a lasting memento of your appreciation, which creates a living legacy for your family, town and planet.

We are more than one fifth of the way there, 38 of the 187 trees/shrubs have been purchased by donors who are recognized on the main gateway sign at the beginning of the trail. The three levels of $500,  $300 and $100, indicate which choice of tree and includes planting materials such as topsoil, stakes, wiring, bone meal, etc.  $100 purchases a shrub, such as a rose; $300 purchases a regular tree (trembling aspen, white ash, etc,); and $500 purchases a specimen tree such as an oak or red maple. These trees and shrubs meet the specifications as outlined in the plans donated by Parks Canada.

We thank John Perrin, Phyllis & Anthony Bevan, Ray Young, Hands Fireworks, Tom & Marilyn Campbell, and Allan Gillis who bought donor trees after July 1st this year. 

As a donor, your dedication will be acknowledged on an individual plaque which will be mounted on the main ‘donor tree’ – all part of the main gateway sign to the trail.  These plaques will be erected each Canada Day in a celebration held at the main gateway sign.

To find out which trees are still available for purchase, call or email me at 657-4688, email ras@ripnet.com.  All donors receive a tax-deductible receipt. Considering the maple?  The arboretum will feature a number of sugar maples (Acer saccharum) and red maples (Acer rubrum). Often, they are difficult to tell apart. A sugar maple is more rounded in form, having slightly larger leaves, is a slower growing tree, and hence, it is often referred to as a hard maple. Both are averse to salt, pollutants, and small, compacted planting spaces such as small lawns or boulevards - they're best for large lawns and parks.  Both provide varied autumn colour from yellow to orange to red - no guarantees though, unless you buy a named cultivar from a nursery. The flowers open up before the leaves and are red on the red maple and yellow on the sugar maple. Then, when the leaves open up on a red maple, they are tinged with red and are slightly grey underneath, which is not true of a sugar maple. The red maple, a great Canadian symbol, was the first tree planted at the waterfront on Canada Day 2002.

 

Oasis Institute for Healthy Living Inc. - Ontario, Canada